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Sommersemester 2022Sommersemester 2022
16.5.2022 : 17:32 : +0200

Seminar in International Economics im Sommersemester 2022

 

Das FIW bietet gemeinsam mit dem Wiener Institut für Internationale Wirtschaftsvergleiche (wiiw) regelmäßig Vorlesungen in Form eines Seminars in "International Economics" an.

Aufgrund der Covid-19 Pandemie finden alle Veranstaltungen im Sommersemester 2022 voraussichtlich als Online-Veranstaltungen statt.

 

CANCELLED - Frictions to intranational investment

 

Thursday, 24th of March 2022, 3:00 p.m. (CET)

Online Event
  

Julian Hinz (Bielefeld University)

 

Due to illness of the presenter, this seminar had to be cancelled. As soon as a new date is fixed, we will announce it on our website.

 

The presentation is based on a joint work with Inga Heiland (Statistics Norway, University of Oslo).

 

Description:

Despite unhalted technological progress in transport and communication infrastructure over the past century, geographical and cultural distance remain major obstacles to the flow of goods and production factors to date. In this paper, we show that geographical and cultural distance forcefully shape intranational investment flows in Norway, preventing an efficient allocation of capital to firms. To that end, we derive a structural gravity equation of investment from a general equilibrium model with multiple locations, multiple assets, and information frictions. Based on the model, we identify frictions related to geographical distance, travel time, administrative borders, and language differences and quantify the loss in terms of portfolio efficiency caused by each individual friction and by gravity as a whole. Through the lense of the model, we also study the impact of a major infrastructure policy program from the 2000s: The government-funded roll-out of broadband internet access across the country.

 

Migrants, networks and regional trade: Evidence from European regions


Thursday, 07th of April 2022, 3:00 p.m. (CET)
Online Event


Evgenii Monastyrenko (University of Luxembourg)

 

Registration link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_B1ypEExlQjezae9z3_1ECA
The dial-in link will be sent immediately after registration.

 

Description:

This paper presents the first cross-country evidence on the contribution of migrants to trade flows at the regional level. Using a novel database of regional trade flows between 267 European regions for 2013, this study examines how migrants affect trade flows between European regions and the rest of the world. A standard gravity model and shift-share instruments based on past settlements are used to claim causality.The results suggest that a 10% increase in immigration increases exports by 1.21%.This marginal effect is more substantial for highly qualified migrants (2.52%) and for imports (2.5%). The impact of migrants further varies by the level of economic development of the region and the quality of institutions in both the host and origin countries.

 

Gathering support for green tax reform


Thursday, 05th of May 2022, 3:00 p.m. (CET)

Online-Event
  

Armon Rezai, Vienna University of Economics and Business

 

Registration link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_adVR37anTaSKSZJ_ATKe3w
The dial-in link will be sent immediately after registration.

 

Description:

The presentation is based on a paper co-authored with Frederick van der Ploeg and Miguel Tovar.

 

Green tax reform is unpopular because, typically, the poor are hurt most by the higher prices of carbon-intensive commodities. If revenues from a carbon tax are recycled, it may be feasible to gain popular support for green tax reform. To investigate this, we estimate an EASI demand system from German household data and a labour supply schedule, using wage data, and the German income tax schedule and let emission intensities decline in the carbon tax. If the revenue from a carbon tax is recycled via a lump-sum transfer to all households, this gives more equitable albeit less efficient outcomes, yet 70% of households are worse off. If the revenue is recycled via lower income taxes, there is more efficiency at the expense of more inequality, and about half of households benefit. With a recycling mix of lump-sum transfers and lower income taxes, popular support can be mustered without hurting equity too much. We also investigate the effects of Germany meeting its legal target for curbing emissions by 55% in 2030 relative to 1990 levels. We find that most of emission reductions are due to producers responding by lowering emission intensities rather than by consumers to less carbon-intensive consumption categories.

 

Gender Differences in Mobility after Childbirth and Implications for the Gender Gap in Employment

Thursday, 12th of May 2022, 3:00 p.m. (CET)

Online-Event
  

Andrea Albanese, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research (LISER)

 

Registration link:
https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_JCX2IRpHQai6SLuGeL0Y4w
The dial-in link will be sent immediately after registration.

 

Description:

The presentation is based on a paper with the same title co-authored with Adrian Nieto and Konstantinos Tatsiramos.

 

Using a novel event study specification that accounts for treatment heterogeniety together with Belgian social security and geo-location data at the individual leve, we study mobility as a determinant of the gender gap in employment. We find that, following childbirth, individuals are less likely to change of residence regardless of their gender, but that only mothers commute less and work less outside their region of residence. Consistent with this finding, childbirth not only reduces employment for mothers relative to fathers, but the gender gaps of non-local employment and high-paying jobs are higher than the gender gaps on local employment and low-paying positions, respectively. Lastly, we show that a higher level of unemployment in the region of residence prior to childbirth lead to a higher gender gap in employment after childbirth. As childbirth reduces mobility, individuals' employment status may be more reliant to the initial regional conditions.