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Wintersemester 2020/21Winter Term 2020/21
5.3.2021 : 2:00 : +0100

Der Forschungsschwerpunkt Internationale Wirtschaft (FIW) (undefinedhttps://www.fiw.ac.at/) ist eine Kooperation zwischen der Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien (WU), der Universität Wien, der Johannes Kepler Universität Linz und der Universität Innsbruck, WIFO, wiiw und WSR. FIW wird von den Bundesministerien BMBFW und BMDW unterstützt.

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  • undefinedAW-Curriculum: Seminar Verteilungseffekte im Freihandel

Seminar in International Economics im Wintersemester 2020/21

 

Das FIW bietet gemeinsam mit dem wiiw regelmäßig Vorlesungen in Form eines Seminars in "International Economics" an.

Aufgrund der Covid-19 Pandemie finden die Veranstaltungen im Wintersemester 2020/2021 als Webinare statt.

 

Robot Imports and Firm-Level Outcomes

 

Thursday, 25th of February 2021, 3:00 p.m.

Webinar
  

Rosario Crinò  (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore)

 

Registration link: https://my.demio.com/ref/ONqvCLkky93dkzsO
The participation link will be sent to you immediately after registration.
 

Technical requirements: This webinar should work in all recent browsers, on all common devices including tablets and smartphones. Please avoid Internet Explorer, as it is outdated and no longer maintained. We recommend to use up-to-date versions of Firefox, Chrome, Edge or Safari. If you have problems with one of them, please try another one of these.

 

Description:

The presentation is based on a paper co-authored with Alessandra Bonfiglioli, Harald Fadinger and Gino Gancia.
 

We use French data over the 1994-2013 period to study how imports of industrial robots affect firm-level outcomes. Compared to other firms operating in the same 5-digit sector, robot importers are larger, more productive, and employ a higher share of managers and engineers. Over time, robot import occurs after periods of expansion in firm size, and is followed by improvements in efficiency and a fall in demand for labor. Guided by a simple model, we develop various empirical strategies to identify the causal effects of robot adoption. Our results suggest that, while demand shocks generate a positive correlation between robot imports and employment, exogenous changes in automation lead to job losses. We also find that robot imports increase productivity and the employment share of high-skill professions, but have a weak effect on total sales. The latter result suggests that productivity gains from automation may not be entirely passed on to consumers in the form of lower prices.

 

Decentralized management model over the state ownership in Polish state owned enterprises

Thursday, 28th of January 2021, 4:00 p.m
Webinar
  

Adam Pilat (University of Warsaw)

 

Registration link: undefinedhttps://my.demio.com/ref/3K5GUMroc4mU3aIr
The participation link will be sent to you immediately after registration.

Technical requirements: This webinar should work in all recent browsers, on all common devices including tablets and smartphones. Please avoid Internet Explorer, as it is outdated and no longer maintained. We recommend to use up-to-date versions of Firefox, Chrome, Edge or Safari. If you have problems with one of them, please try another one of these.


Description:

A preliminary analysis of the three-year experiment.

Most of the previous studies of the SOEs is focused on the comparison of the performance of state-owned and private companies. Empirical analyses of the decentralized and centralized systems of ownership management are very scarce. From the beginning of 2017 new regulation of the state ownership management is in force in Poland – it was introduced to increase efficiency of the supervision and management over the SOEs. Empirical evaluation of the reform is the main goal of the study. Main hypotheses assume that reform introduced from the beginning of 2017 entailed improvement of profitability and effectiveness of the Polish SOEs. In order to empirically evaluate the hypotheses difference-in-differences approach and panel data model were applied. Results reveal underperformance of the Polish SOEs in comparison to their private counterparties but do not provide sufficient proof of significant impact of the reform.

 

Trade, Firm-Delocation, and Optimal Climate Policy

Thursday, 21st of January 2021, 4:00 p.m.

Webinar
  

Ahmad Lashkaripour (Indiana University)

 

Registration link: undefinedhttps://my.demio.com/ref/dBpcEhy15KvsmpcJ
The participation link will be sent to you immediately after registration.

Technical requirements: This webinar should work in all recent browsers, on all common devices including tablets and smartphones. Please avoid Internet Explorer, as it is outdated and no longer maintained. We recommend to use up-to-date versions of Firefox, Chrome, Edge or Safari. If you have problems with one of them, please try another one of these.


Description:

To what extent can trade policy help reduce global carbon emissions? We examine this question using a multi-country multi-industry general equilibrium trade model with transboundary carbon externalities. Our framework accommodates firm-delocation in response to policy, multi-lateral carbon leakage, and returns to scale in production and abatement. Our central result is a set of simple formulas for unilaterally optimal trade and carbon taxes in an open economy. The optimal policy consists of (i) a uniform carbon tax across all industries; (ii) industry-level production subsidies that restore marginal-cost-pricing independent of the industry’s carbon intensity; (iii) industry-level import taxes that penalize carbon-intensive imports but less so in high-returns-to-scale industries; and (vi) industry-level export subsidies that, in addition to improving the terms of trade, promote clean exports against carbon-intensive foreign competition. Mapping our formulas to data, we find that trade taxes can replicate only around 3% of the carbon reduction attainable under (first-best) cooperative global carbon taxes. This lack of effectiveness is partly driven by a tension between the carbon-reducing and terms-of-trade rationales for trade taxation under scale economies. Trade taxes, however, can be remarkably effective at enforcing international climate agreements even in the presence of scale economies and firm-delocation effects.

 

Multinational firms' pace of expansion within host countries: How high rates of pro-market reform hamper the local exploitation of foreign expansion knowledge

Wednesday, 25th of November 2020, 3:00 p.m.

Webinar
  

Thomas Lindner, Vera Kunczer
(both Vienna University of Economics and Business)

 

Registration link: https://my.demio.com/ref/TZ8Rbsq9f145Jd2Q
The participation link will be sent to you immediately after registration.
 

Technical requirements: This webinar should work in all recent browsers, on all common devices including tablets and smartphones. Please avoid Internet Explorer, as it is outdated and no longer maintained. We recommend to use up-to-date versions of Firefox, Chrome, Edge or Safari. If you have problems with one of them, please try another one of these.

 

The presentation is based on a publication with the same title. 

 

Description:

Although increases in corporate ownership positions in foreign markets occur frequently, the factors that determine how quickly such increases occur are underexplored. Combining international business research on experiential learning, knowledge recombination, and pro-market reform, we hypothesize that a firm's international experience with ownership increases has a positive effect on the pace at which the firm implements an ownership increase in a host country, but that this effect is weaker during periods of quicker pro-market reform in the country. We find support for our hypotheses in an analysis of Austrian firms expanding in Central and Eastern Europe, suggesting that, rather than merely being beneficial to foreign investors, pro-market reform also poses a challenge to them.
 

Presentation slides

 

Keywords: Expansion pace, Ownership increases, Pro-market reform, Experiential knowledge, Recombination